Do you need to wear a medical ID bracelet or necklace?

Posted on September 27, 2017 by kerri

If you have been diagnosed with a chronic medical condition or take medication regularly, you may wonder if you should wear a medical ID bracelet or necklace to stay safe. When I was diagnosed with asthma, I wasn’t sure if it was necessary to wear a medical ID bracelet, but after a few months, I decided to get one. Fortunately I’ve never needed it, but it makes me feel better knowing my medical information is close at hand, just in case!

Food Allergy Awareness Bracelet

The only one who can help you decide whether or not a medical ID bracelet is necessary for you is your doctor. However, just because your doctor has not told you that you need one, doesn’t mean that you don’t! A list of common (and not so common!) reasons people wear medical ID jewelry include:

  • Allergies
  • Alzheimer Disease
  • Anaphylaxis/anaphylactic risk
  • Artificial heart valve
  • Asthma
  • Autism or autism spectrum disorder
  • Bleeding disorder
  • Blind or visually impaired/low vision
  • Blood-thinner medications
  • Blood type
  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer
  • Caregiver to a person with chronic disease
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chemotherapy
  • Chronic Bronchitis
  • Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Clinical trials participant
  • Cochlear implant – No MRI
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Contact lenses
  • Coumadin (a blood thinner drug that may put people at risk in an emergency)
  • Dairy allergy
  • Deaf
  • Dementia
  • Developmental disability
  • Diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2
  • Dialysis
  • Do not resuscitate (also known as a DNR bracelet)
  • Drug allergy
  • Egg allergy
  • Emphysema
  • Epilepsy
  • Epi-Pen or epinephrine
  • Fish allergy
  • Food allergy
  • Gastric bypass surgery
  • Glaucoma
  • Hard of hearing/hearing impaired
  • Hearing aid or cochlear implant
  • Heart disease or heart patient
  • Hemophilia
  • High blood pressure or hypertension
  • Hypoglycemia
  • ICD implanted cardioverter defibrillator patient
  • Insulin dependent diabetes – type 1 or type 2 insulin dependent
  • Insulin pump
  • Kidney disease
  • Latex allergy
  • Legume allergy
  • Lung disease
  • Lymphedema
  • Milk allergy
  • Movement disorders
  • Multiple medications
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Narcolepsy
  • Nut allergy
  • No MRI
  • No blood pressure this/left/right arm
  • No blood transfusions
  • Non-verbal
  • Organ donor
  • Organ transplant recipient
  • Pacemaker
  • Peanut allergy
  • Penicillin allergy
  • Prednisone or prednisone dependent
  • Pregnant
  • Rare disease
  • Seizure disorder
  • Severe asthma
  • Shellfish allergy
  • Sickle cell anemia or sickle cell disease
  • Sleep apnea
  • Sleep disorder
  • Sulfa allergy
  • Sports safety
  • Steroid dependent
  • Sting allergy (bee allergy, wasp allergy)
  • Stroke patient
  • Transplant recipient
  • Tree nut allergy
  • Tourette Syndrome
  • Type 1 Diabetes
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Visually impaired or low vision
  • Warfarin (a blood thinner drug that may put people at risk in an emergency)
  • Weight loss surgery (gastric bypass surgery or lap band surgery)

This list may look long but it’s just a short list of why people wear medical ID bracelets or necklaces and why you might need to consider wearing one, too. Medical ID does not have to be obtrusive or annoying, and while it should be noticeable to first responders, it does not have to draw attention to your illness,  health condition, disability, or medical needs. Medical ID jewelry is meant to keep you safe—but the only way it can do that is to wear it. That’s why it’s important to buy a good quality product that you like to wear, but can easily be read by other people. Our bold, black engraving at My Identity Doctor ensures that when seconds count, first responders can read your information to give you the care you need.

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